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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
spending. he went from 70% support down to below 50% and lost the house. now he gets re-elected with less strength, not against a war hero but a guy from massachusetts, and the republicans have the house and he thinks somebody made him king and he's going to have more taxes, more spending, and more regulations. it's a real problem for him. he doesn't have the mandate he thinks he does. so i think he takes us over the cliff because he doesn't -- he's got blinders on. he doesn't see where he stands in the universe. >> okay. there are a couple things to unpack here. i want to go back to this question -- i think what i'm confused about is this kind of game of smoke and mirrors that seems to be playing out on the right. and i ask you again, is closing a loophole and ending a deduction the same thing as raising taxes? >> you have to look at the whole package. i mean i would think if you're going to -- and the other key thing here is, anybody -- >> is that a no? >> you have to -- first you have to look at the whole package and find out what's in it. to sit here and shoot at negotiating strategie
like it. we have seven weeks between election day and the end of the year, and three of those weeks have been wasted with this nonsense. >> okay. >> treasury secretary tim geithner appeared on five separate sunday morning talk shows. he says it's the gop who have been short on specifics. >> we said how and how much and who should pay. they haven't proposed what they think. >> joining me now is california congressman karen bass. thank you for your time. >> thank you for having me on, tamron. >> let me start off with a question on twitter already posed to the president, and it was what are you willing to compromise to get the fiscal cliff done? what's your answer to that question? >> i think, first of all, many compromises have been done. for example, in the cuts issues there's been over a trillion dollars of cuts. i think democrats have demonstrated over and over again we're willing to compromise and willing to make more compromises, but it's the republicans now that need to come to the table and counter the proposal that the president put forward last week. >> part of the counter of
since the election and the fiscal cliff face off. he reiterated that lying in the sand is higher taxes for the wealthy. he gave republicans some room to maneuver. >> the issue right now that's relevant is the acknowledgment that if we're going to raise revenues that are sufficient to balance with the very tough cuts that we've already made and the further reforms and entitlemented ientitlements i'm prepared to make, we have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. we're not getting a deal without it. understand the reason for that. it's not me being stubborn or partisan, it's a matter of math. >> and the gop plan, which was unveiled yesterday, includes $800 bill onin new taxes made through closing loopholes and deductions and not raising rates. compare that to the president's plan and that's about half of what the white house asked for. republicans propose 600 billion in entitlement saving including raising the medicare requirement to 67, nearly twice what the white house called for. the gop plan changes how social security benefits are calculated, something addressed under the president'
the fiscal cliff. right after the election wall street dropped 5% when everybody suddenly focused on the fiscal cliff and realized that this was a problem. but since then it's kind of bumped along at this sort of level. i don't think wall street is at all sanguine about the idea that if we went over the fiscal cliff, life would go on as we know it and everything would be fine. >> one of the things that was really interesting to me to bear out that point is ken conrad yesterday who's been so down, i mean, he's leaving the senate. he's done this for seven years. they can't produce deals. and yesterday when i interviewed him, joe, he said i think we're going to make this. i think the boehner offer had significant indicators that something here is going on, and they're going to come together. >> also, kent conrad, a guy -- i've loved him for a long time, deficit hawk. they haven't allowed him to put a budget out for years. he's growing frustrated. i'm sure he's going to be glad to leave. but i was surprised by that as well. you see also, sam stein, republicans are now starting to real
economy and those seeking work. i came out the day after the election to put revenues on the table, to take a step toward the president to try to resolve this. when is he going to take a step towards us? >> can you see some way that you could agree to tax rate increase and protect small businesses at the same time, maybe going with the 37%, or some middle ground? >> there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue that the president seeks on the table, but none of it is going to be possible. if the president insists on his position, insists on my way or the highway. that is not the way to get to an agreement that i think is important for the american people and very important for our economy. thanks. >> reporter: for more on the fiscal cliff let's bring in bob sue sack, managing editor of the hill. thanks for joining us. >> thanks for having me on. >> reporter: he says this is a slow walk for our economy to the edge of the fiscal cliff, and if the president doesn't like the republican's plan he has an obligation to send them one that can pass both houses of congress a
? the president, calm, cool and collected and remembering what this election is all about. get your cell phones out. tonight's question. will republicans punish e speaker boehner for trying to work with the president? text a for yes, b to no to 622639. we'll bring the results later on in the show. joining me tonight is congressman emanuel cleaver from missouri. great to have you with us. >> good to be with you. >> i'd like to talk about the congressional black caucus if i could. they have been very, very strong about do not touch the entitlements, we're not going to move on this. so you have the president not moving on rates. you have your caucus moving on entitlements. although you said the democratic leadership -- you said you could support means testing for medicare. what does that mean and how far are you willing to go. >> first of all, social security is off the table. there are not only 42 members in the congressional black caucus who would not vote for a deal that included social security, but the majority of our democratic caucus. social security has not distributed to the deficit. it's
of the election. issues like entitlement reform and new revenue, but he's going to have to do something big. there's been a four-year course of he doesn't get along with either party, doesn't make the kind of effort you're talking about. i don't think there's any doubt he's going to, particularly john boehner, find some human interconnection moment that says we're doing this. and that's when the tough part starts. because once there's a leader deal, getting it through the house, whatever the terms of it is going to be super hard. >> i was with a group of businessmen last night, and their question was, why don't the people in washington do what we do when there's an important decision that comes up? why don't they get into a room and hammer it out, get some food, drinks, whether it's a couple days, get them helicopters, and go to camp david. you get in a room together -- >> the president -- the president doesn't like doing that. he's not comfortable doing that. and jon meacham, that is not the opinion of a pundit, that is a matter of historical record for his first four years. is it not? >> that's
the election, romney's stayed mostly out of the spotlight and pretty quiet. he and paul ryan met with president obama in washington last week. >>> witnesses say it was terrifying, a crushing tunnel collapse about 50 miles west of tokyo. authorities have recovered nine bodies, most of them from burned vehicles. experts say aging parts in the tunnel could be to blame. the disaster has prompted japanese officials to order emergency inspections of dudsens of other tunnels with similar designs across the country. >>> and here's a sign of the times. the pope is on twitter. the vatican today revealed pope benedict's personal handle is @pontifacts. the vatican said the pope believes the catholic church must be present in the digital arena. that's going to be hard to answer a question about faith in 140 characters. >> he'll probably have 1 million followers in two hours. >> he has more than 230,000 followers and he hasn't even had a single tweet. his name means bridge builder in latin. another name for the pope. >> yeah. i'll follow him. >> i will as well. >> are thank you very much. maybe if i follow h
this election. it's not like the debt ceiling debacle in 2011 went over well with the american public. the american public was disgusted by it, it was brinks manship that people did not like to see, in a recession, they thought it endangered the economy, republicans also know that if you look at the polls and they look at the polls, that the public would blame them if we go over the fiscal cliff by a 2 to 1 margin. so i would say that right now, and i think even republicans would stipulate this, wolf. the president has the leverage here, i mean, republicans also know that if they were to go over the cliff that the tax cuts on the wealthy would increase. you could come back and undue the tax cuts on the middle class expiring. but the president's in a pretty good bargaining position here, which is why you see him sort of hold firm. >> what leverage do the republicans have? >> well, look, i think it -- they understand that for some liberals going over the cliff is okay, because liberals say, you know what, we get those defense cuts we wouldn't get otherwise, and they believe the public w
a pretty dramatic shift since the election, and certainly i salute him for doing this, he actually is very engaged with the business community. and i'm not hearing the sort of things from top ceos and business leaders today that i heard the first four years. maybe -- maybe he's leaning in here and trying to rebuild a relationship with some of these people who supported him in '08. >> and i think it goes both ways. i think the business community views this deficit thing as the biggest problem that we can solve that we need to solve. there's something called a campaign to fix the debt, which i'm on the steering committee, 120 leading ceos from everything from general electric to jpmorgan on down. really committed to doing something and accepting the idea that revenues have to go up, not ideological about how, but most of all, wanting a big $4 trillion package. and so they have become, in effect, allies of the president. they're really trying to get to the same place. at some point there may be differences over how much entitlements, how much this or that, but right now their interests are al
and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail or in the streets in opposition for their entire careers. they come into office. why would we think that they spent all their time out of office reading the federalists papers in arabic translations? they didn't. the only political game they know how to play is the old play. >> get power. >> seize it. in this case, the
johns, hitting back. pizza chain's favorability score dropped from 32 on election day to 4 at the end of last month. 40 is the top score. papa john's released a statement saying the results are contradictory to another study by the same company showing significant reputation gains. that statement also says the ceo made, his remarks on the affordable care act were mischaracterized in the media. that mischaracterization didn't seem to have had an effect on the brand. >>> new jersey governor chris christie isn't shy about asking the federal government for money. he wants fema to reimburse the state for 100% of its emergency costs following superstorm sandy. the total? nearly $40 billion. >>> we've heard the controversy surrounding the food stamp program. another politician is taking the challenge to see what it's like for other people who rely on it. newark mayor cory booker is pledging to live off food stamps for one week, joining other celebrities like mario batali, colorado governor john hickenlooper, philadelphia mayor michael nutter and representative robert brady. joining me now is
? he was just re-elected. why couldn't he put together a package, a deal to avoid this disaster? >> i think this is a question of political leadership. and as that poll showed, there's no doubt that the president has the political advantage going into this. but at some point, and i think we're kind of getting close to it, the president has to be able to pivot and to say how do i turn this political advantage into a real policy accomplishment? and, wolf, i don't think you're going to do that with continued campaign style events like we just saw meeting with middle class families. okay. we get that. that occurred during the campaign. the white house has clearly gotten its message out. i think now there has to be a next step. you know, timing is everything in politics. and this is absolutely no different. what i'm getting from talking to some democrats on the hill is i think there's actually a lot of pent up anger and frustration among democrats how they feel republicans were obstructionist for the last four years. there's a little bit of payback going on here. they've got the advantage.
a dozen tea party-like conservatives elected. >> let me jump in, dana. i want to run through them because, you know, when we think senator demint we think of a tea party stronghold within the u.s. senate and helped and also hurt a number of republican candidates. who were they? >> reporter: that's right. great. let's start with the senators now. obviously, who he helped elect. this is the positive side of his millions and his work. marco rubio, pat toomey. very conservative, anti-tax, anti-government purists in the mold of jim demint. however, he also backed in republican primaries a number of republican candidates who simply were not electable according to the republican establishment and the establishment was right. for example, remember christine o'donnell, i'm not a witch, from delaware. ken buck of colorado. and others. so those are some of the reasons why he definitely has ruffled many a-feather with the party leaders and i have to tell you first thing i saw when the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell released a statement today was making the point that demint had, quote, unco
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)